Government vs Technology


I think everybody knows tech startups like Uber and Airbnb, which disrupt the, in this case, “old-fashioned” taxi and hotel market. Many see these companies as heroes who change the rules of the market. However, the government and the traditional companies are not that happy with these companies as they create unfair competition. This has led to many lawsuits in order to forbid these kind of companies. Is it the task of the government to intervene to restore the traditional market or do they need to embrace these companies as they innovate the industry?

I personally think that the government has to embrace these companies as they just found a more profitable way to deliver the services/ products. Survival of the fittest as Darwin would say. These companies show that the current regulations are old-fashioned and that it is time to review the regulations in order to improve the technology. During our Bachelor Business Administration we all read cases where companies failed, because they did not adapt to their changing environment. If companies have to adapt, I am convinced that the government has to do the same.

Sam Altman, the president of Y Combinator, stated that “The greatest threat to this country is incompetence of governance”. He says that the government has to adapt faster to the rapidly growing technology, otherwise there will be a mismatch.

In order to keep up with technology, policy makers have to collaborate more with these disrupters to innovate the rules. For example, currently many different companies are investing in self-driving cars, but for these self-driving cars you will need to have modified road rules.

It is important for the government to adapt and react faster to technology. As the Conversation states “New technology will force new rules, whether we like it or not”.

Source:

http://theconversation.com/keeping-up-or-holding-back-the-regulation-challenge-for-government-47915

http://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/blog/techflash/2015/09/y-combinator-s-sam-altman-sees-dark-future-if.html

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2 responses to “Government vs Technology”

  1. 371392nb says :

    I came across an article by Ian Sherr on Cnet.com about the Indian government and Facebook and thought this would be a good contribution to your blog post. The article is about a conversation Mark Zuckerberg and the Indian prime minister Narendra Modi had at an event at Facebook’s headquarters. Modi is not at all ‘against’ technology as you subscribed. In fact, he is cheering on the use of Facebook for governments. He has increasingly used social media to connect with other governments, as well as with the Indian people. He also mentioned his main effort, ‘to link India’s 600,000 villages through fiber optic networks’, which he describes are the 21st century highways (Sherr, 2015).

    So, in contradiction to what you’re saying, governments (or at least the Indian one) áre actively collaborating with the disrupters. The Indian government is a great example of following the ‘new rules’ as you’re stating, so it would be wrong to say that all governments are in the same position here. I agree, some governments could be more proactive towards technology trends, but apparently some are ahead of technology, as Mark Zuckerberg himself was even surprised by the prime ministers thoughts.

    Like companies, not all governments are the same. But in contrast to companies, a governments cannot go bankrupt in a split second, there’s bigger stakes on the line. I agree that in general, governments are operating in a more old-fasion way than companies nowadays, but they certainly can learn from each other.

    Reference: Sherr, I. (2015) ‘India’s Modi, in Facebook talk, pushes Internet as key way to govern’, available on http://www.cnet.com/news/indias-modi-in-facebook-talk-pushes-internet-as-key-way-to-govern/ [Accessed 27 September 2015]

    • 371392nb says :

      I came across an article by Ian Sherr on Cnet.com about the Indian government and Facebook and thought this would be a good contribution to your blog post. The article is about a conversation Mark Zuckerberg and the Indian prime minister Narendra Modi had at an event at Facebook’s headquarters. Modi is not at all ‘against’ technology as you subscribed. In fact, he is cheering on the use of Facebook for governments. He has increasingly used social media to connect with other governments, as well as with the Indian people. He also mentioned his main effort, ‘to link India’s 600,000 villages through fiber optic networks’, which he describes are the 21st century highways (Sherr, 2015).

      So, in contradiction to what you’re saying, governments (or at least the Indian one) áre actively collaborating with the disrupters. The Indian government is a great example of following the ‘new rules’ as you’re stating, so it would be wrong to say that all governments are in the same position here. I agree, some governments could be more proactive towards technology trends, but apparently some are ahead of technology, as Mark Zuckerberg himself was even surprised by the prime ministers thoughts.

      Like companies, not all governments are the same. But in contrast to companies, a governments cannot go bankrupt in a split second, there’s bigger stakes on the line. I agree that in general, governments are operating in a more old-fasion way than companies nowadays, but they certainly can learn from each other.

      Reference: Sherr, I. (2015) ‘India’s Modi, in Facebook talk, pushes Internet as key way to govern’, available on http://www.cnet.com/news/indias-modi-in-facebook-talk-pushes-internet-as-key-way-to-govern/ [Accessed 27 September 2015]

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